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Japanese Chain Lotteria Rolls Out Potato Chip Burgers


The Japanese chain is topping its burgers with potato chips now

Lotteria's latest burger is topped with crunchy potato chips.

The Japanese burger chain Lotteria has introduced some very surprising novelty burgers in the past. Once they released a freakishly huge burger with five patties on it. Then they took things in a completely different direction and released a burger with no patty at all. This time, though, Lotteria has been uncharacteristically restrained in its burger development, because the new product is a burger topped with potato chips, and it actually looks pretty great.

According to Rocket News 24, the new potato chip burgers are part of a collaboration between Lotteria and Japanese potato chip company Calbee. There are two options: a cheese potato chip burger with a beef patty, and a “salad chicken” potato chip burger that has lettuce and tomato and potato chips served on top of a chicken patty. Both look pretty amazing, and the crispy potato chips are designed to add a nice bit of crunch to the burgers' texture. The new burgers sell for $3.39 and $3.15, respectively, and will be available for a limited time.

In addition to the potato chip burgers, Lotteria and Calbee also came out with a line of seasoned French fry shakers. Those are bags of French fries that are intended to be shaken up to cover the fries with specialty seasonings like Consommé W Punch, Wasabi Beef, Rich Salt, and Dark Nori Seaweed Salt.


What’s the difference between 'cheeseburger' and 'double cheeseburger' flavored chips?

One of the best offerings on the Japanese fast-food landscape is the Zeppin Cheeseburger from Lotteria. Simply, beef, gouda, and cheddar cheese on a bun. Granted it’s a lot of cheese, but the Zeppin Cheeseburger foregoes all the flavor and texture distractions of sauces and vegetables to offer pure meat and cheese satisfaction.

And now this can be enjoyed in chip form, thanks to a collaboration with major chipmaker Calbee. However, we will won’t be seeing Calbee Potato Chips Lotteria Zeppin Cheeseburger Flavor like we did back in 2015. Instead Calbee Potato Chips Lotteria DoubleZeppin Cheeseburger Flavor has hit the shelves.

While that sounds great, it raises the question: what’s the difference between “cheeseburger” flavored potato chips and “double cheeseburger” flavored potato chips?

Looking at the burger counterparts, the flavor is essentially the same, it’s just that you get more of it with a double cheeseburger. So how does that translate to the language of potato chip flavors?

To find out, our reporter Seiji Nakazawa contacted a Calbee rep:

“So for your Double Zeppin Cheeseburger flavor chips, how did you get the ‘double’ feeling? For example, is the Double Zeppin Cheeseburger chip all thick-cut and super-rippled so that the regular Zeppin Cheeseburger chip looks thin and weak in comparison?”

"Both the chips and ripples are the same size. The taste is better. We’ve raised the juiciness of the beef flavor and the sharpness of the cheese.”

“You mean it’s a richer cheeseburger taste?”

So there you have it. Calbee Potato Chips Lotteria Double Zeppin Cheeseburger will have an enhanced beef and cheese flavor from their previous run. This is great news as so-called “cheeseburger chips” are often just barbecue sauce and cheese flavored. These promise to have a really meaty taste to them instead.

So, head on out to your nearest Japanese convenience store for some Double Zeppin Cheeseburger potato chips when they come out on 22 July and get a coupon for 150 yen off a real Double Zeppin Cheeseburger combo at Lotteria on each bag.

It should also prepare you for when Calbee refines their taste even more and achieves Zeppin Tower Cheeseburger flavor potato chips.


German Krautburgers

Hamburgers have become one of the most popular sandwiches in the world thanks to fast food chains and backyard barbecues alike. The famed sammie is often said to have originated in Germany. And we’ve previously posted another German recipe which is very like a hamburger, the humble frikadellen. But, now we’ve got yet another spin on the meat + bread formula: the krautburger.

These hearty rolls are filled to brimming with sauerkraut, fresh cabbage, beef, and cheese. It sounds deceptively simple, but these buns are both delicious and comforting at the same time. Sort of like a German take on piroshky or calzone, these savory buns are best served with some mustard or ketchup to dip them into.

Krautburgers are thought to have been brought to the US around the turn of the 20th century by the Volga Germans who lived in and around Southeastern Russia. These hand pies are known as runza, bierock, and by other regional names as well.

To make this recipe you’ll need to start with the dough, which needs time to rise. Warm (not hot) milk is mixed with one packet of instant yeast and some sugar. This mixture needs to sit for 5 minutes so that the yeast can become activated.

Then combine this mixture with flour and oil and you’ll be left with a soft dough. Knead the dough for 6-8 minutes and then allow to rise for an hour. This might seem like a lot of work for some stuffed buns, but it’s so worth it. The freshly-made yeast dough is the perfect compliment to the rich filling inside each one.

While the dough is rising brown the beef and then to the meat add your onion and spices. The simple mixture uses onion, garlic powder, and salt and pepper as the seasonings, and it’s just the right blend for this recipe.

Add the beef to some steamed cabbage and some ready-made sauerkraut and then work on the dough. Roll out the dough on a floured work surface and cut into 6″ squares. Add some cheese to each square then top with 1/3 cup of the beef filling. Pinch opposite corners of each square to seal them shut.

Place the buns seam side down on a baking sheet and bake for 15-20 minutes. At this point the tops should be deliciously browned and ready to go. Since the beef and veggies were cooked before going in, the baking is all about melting the cheese, browning the buns, and melding all the flavors together in a harmonious blend.

These buns are stick-to-your-ribs food and they remind me of growing up having sauerkraut as a side to hamburgers in the summer months, but all wrapped up together in a neat package. Plus, the nature of these stuffed rolls means they travel really well and make great lunches and picnic fare!


An Iconic American Food, Japanese-Style

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You won't often catch me enjoying sweet potato and mayo on my pizza, but I do get excited when skewed foreign incarnations of American fast foods slingshot back to the States&mdashas they have at the purveyor of the aforementioned delicacy, the chain Cheogajip/Pizza and Chicken Love Letter, whose wild success in South Korea prompted it to stake out a toehold in a Niles strip mall in early 2008. But even more than straight versions of ethnic cuisine, these hybrids seem to have a hard time attracting customers outside the target immigrant community.

Four and a half months ago, when 37-year-old graphic designer Masaru Wachi opened Gabutto Burger, his Japanese-style burger stand in the Mitsuwa Marketplace food court, he was banking on an audience wider than Japanese expats to develop a yen for a very particular style of burger.

Wachi had no previous restaurant experience. But as a native of Chiba Prefecture, just southeast of Tokyo, he'd eaten his share of teriyaki burgers. Mos Burger and McDonald's, the chains he modeled Gabutto on, have thousands of franchises across Japan, so he knew what he was going for. He planned and executed Gabutto Burger&mdashnamed for the onomatopoeic Japanese word for munching&mdashover the course of about a year, studying trade magazines and Japanese recipe Web sites. His pitch to Mitsuwa's management, featuring the recipes he developed, was enthusiastically accepted.

Yet after a third of a year, in the midst of a collapsed-economy burger craze, the Gabutto burger hasn't found its way onto any of the recent top burger lists generated by local food writers. And that's not surprising. Wachi's patty formula incorporates an odd collection of ingredients&mdashbeef, pork (for extra fat), fresh panko bread crumbs for binding and, as Washi describes it, juice retention, plus milk to "kill the pork taste, kinda." Not strange at all in Japan. But maybe a bit hard to swallow here.

Wachi's patties come doused with one of two sweet sauces: teriyaki or, for the standard Gabutto burger, a proprietary demi-glace "prepared slowly over a small flame," according to the menu.

Sweetness is important to the Japanese burger palate. "A lot of Japanese burgers use a lot of sugars and stuff," says Wachi. This extends to the buns he commissioned from the nearby Japanese Bakery Crescent in Arlington Heights. The soft pillows&mdashupon which he brands the Gabutto Burger logo with a special tool akin to a soldering gun&mdasharen't dissimilar to brioche. "You can eat it as a breakfast bread," Wachi says.

While the quarter-pound patties themselves are densely formed&mdashI've heard them aptly described more than once as meatloaflike&mdashthe finished constructions are fragile. Top them with cheese and a fried egg and you have a potential disaster on your hands, the diaphanous bun disintegrating in the sauce, sending patties and tomatoes squirting into paper-lined baskets.

Wachi also offers tofu and chicken burgers and a barbecued pork burger sandwiched by two toasted patties formed from a mixture of regular and sweet rice. Completing the experience are thin shoestring fries meant to be dusted with one or more of five powdered flavorings, some that wouldn't taste out of place in a potato chip bag&mdashwasabi, garlic and butter, ranch, sour cream, and a salty "original spice" flavor. For the kids he's installed a number of coin-operated vending machines filled with the tiny plastic collectible toys called gashapon . Order a kids' combo and the token's an extra buck.

Wachi suspects his burgers have been slow to catch on with non-Japanese because he's done no advertising. But he has something else up his sleeve to supplement business until they catch on. He's recently added another, more purely Japanese item to the menu: obanyaki, pancakes stuffed with sweet red bean paste or custard cream. And if those take off he'll be adding chocolate cream and green tea flavors.

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Sushi

Remember when most Americans positively hurled at the mere thought of eating raw fish? If you're under 30, probably not. But until the 1980s, sushi was widely viewed as some kind of culinary treachery perpetrated by the coastal elite who'd begun to cotton to it, and the patriotic heartland was having none of their post–World War II garbage.

What changed? According to Mental Floss, it was a threefold process involving the phenom TV miniseries Shōgun and a simultaneous wave of Japanese immigration — both of which gave us greater exposure to Japan's culture — as well as new research on seafood's health benefits, which encouraged us to expand our meat-and-potatoes horizons. Still, we didn't suddenly start gobbling sea-urchin gonads and legit poisonous puffer fish en masse—which brings us to a fourth fold: Enter the California roll.

As the story goes, its invention in either Los Angeles or Vancouver in the 1970s killed two birds with one stone. First, the combination of cooked or imitation crab and avocado approximated the flavor and texture of raw tuna second, an outer layer of rice hid the band of seaweed from the prying eyes of guests who distrusted vegetables even more than fish. The trick worked: We got hooked, branching out from there not only to a whole subgenre of deep-fried, inside-out, cream-cheese concessions, but also to straight-up sashimi, fish tartare, ceviche, and poke to boot. The Japanese may have lost the war, but they won the all-important battle for our tastebuds.


Top Secret Famous Recipes Ebook

Yield: 6 Servings
COATING MIX ====================
1 T sugar
1 1/2 c self-rising flour
1/2 c cornstarch
4 t seasoned salt
2 t paprika
1/2 t baking soda
1/2 c biscuit mix
1 pk italian dressing mix
1 pk onion soup mix
FRIED CHICKEN ==================
2 eggs
1/4 c cold water
1 c oil
2 1/2 lb chicken parts
Combine all ingredients. Mix to blend. Store tightly covered at room temperature.
To use mix: Beat eggs with cold water. Dip cut-up chicken in egg mixture and then into dry coating mix, then back into egg and back into mix. Heat oil in a heavy skillet. Brown chicken skin side down for 4 -6 minutes on medium-high heat. Turn and brown other side. Transfer to an oiled or Pammed 9x12x2 baking pan. Cover pan in foil sealing on 3 sides. Bake at 350 degrees for about 45-50 minutes. Remove foil. Bake another 5 minutes to crisp coating.

"Good As Gold" Chicken. (Like Kfc And Boston's)

Yield: 4 Servings
1/4 c oil
1 T honey
1 T lime juice
1/4 t paprika
1 seasoned salt (to taste)
4 chicken breast halves
Mix ingredients (except chicken) in a saucepan and warm just to melt honey. Arrange chicken breast-side-up in a square baking dish or pan and bake uncovered at 400 degrees about 35 - 40 minutes, basting pieces without turning them, 3 or 4 times during baking. Immediately upon removing from oven, seal baking dish or pan tightly in foil and let stand 15 to 20 minutes before serving.


Top Secret Famous Recipes Ebook

Yield: 6 Servings
COATING MIX ====================
1 T sugar
1 1/2 c self-rising flour
1/2 c cornstarch
4 t seasoned salt
2 t paprika
1/2 t baking soda
1/2 c biscuit mix
1 pk italian dressing mix
1 pk onion soup mix
FRIED CHICKEN ==================
2 eggs
1/4 c cold water
1 c oil
2 1/2 lb chicken parts
Combine all ingredients. Mix to blend. Store tightly covered at room temperature.
To use mix: Beat eggs with cold water. Dip cut-up chicken in egg mixture and then into dry coating mix, then back into egg and back into mix. Heat oil in a heavy skillet. Brown chicken skin side down for 4 -6 minutes on medium-high heat. Turn and brown other side. Transfer to an oiled or Pammed 9x12x2 baking pan. Cover pan in foil sealing on 3 sides. Bake at 350 degrees for about 45-50 minutes. Remove foil. Bake another 5 minutes to crisp coating.

"Good As Gold" Chicken. (Like Kfc And Boston's)

Yield: 4 Servings
1/4 c oil
1 T honey
1 T lime juice
1/4 t paprika
1 seasoned salt (to taste)
4 chicken breast halves
Mix ingredients (except chicken) in a saucepan and warm just to melt honey. Arrange chicken breast-side-up in a square baking dish or pan and bake uncovered at 400 degrees about 35 - 40 minutes, basting pieces without turning them, 3 or 4 times during baking. Immediately upon removing from oven, seal baking dish or pan tightly in foil and let stand 15 to 20 minutes before serving.


Real Good Foods

Courtesy of Real Good Foods

Real Good Foods lives up to its name. Made with whole food ingredients (i.e. chicken breast or cauliflower, rather than processed flours and starches), each product is loaded with protein and minimal carbs/sugars. Offerings include breakfast sandwiches (choose between bacon and egg or sausage and egg), stuffed chicken dishes, chicken poppers, enchiladas, cauliflower crust pizzas, and more.


Potato recipes

Chips, mash, roasties, dauphinoise. potato is the kitchen gift that keeps on giving. Try one of our new recipe ideas for the humble spud.

Dauphinoise potatoes

Thin slices of potato slow cooked in the oven with cream and garlic – the most decadent of side dishes

Smashed roasties

Boiling the potatoes for longer, then smashing them, makes for more surface area, meaning golden brown beauties and extra crispy bits everyone will love!

Basic fondant potatoes

A fondant potatoes recipe for tender, golden spuds. Cooked with butter, stock and thyme, fondant potatoes are the perfect side to a roast

Fondant potatoes

Try something new with potatoes. Fondant potatoes are favourites with chefs, and are seasoned with rosemary and thyme. They're gorgeous when served as part of a Sunday roast

How to roast potatoes

Learn how to make crispy roast potatoes the easy way – an absolutely essential skill if you want to serve up a delicious Sunday lunch or Christmas dinner.

Crackling potato cake

Transform the humble potato cake into something dinner party perfect with layered potato and crispy pork skin for extra crunch - a good budget choice

Watercress salad with boiled Jersey Royals, roast shallots & pickled radish

Make the most of springtime Jersey Royals in this vibrant salad, with roasted shallots, pickled radish, mint and watercress

French fries

Perfect French fries with our easy recipe – you'll end up with lightly golden, crisp fries. They're great as a snack or side dish to a Friday night feast

Asparagus with peas, mint & Jersey Royals in wild garlic butter

Coat asparagus, peas and Jersey Royals in a mint and wild garlic butter, then top with toasted almonds – the perfect partner to roast meat and savoury tarts

Triple cheese & bacon Dauphinoise

Smoked bacon and a triple hit of gooey, melted cheese takes this classic dish of layered potatoes and double cream to the next level of indulgence - a showstopping side for a dinner party

Jacket potato with whipped feta & sumac

The perfect budget-friendly, filling supper for one. The fragrant, zesty flavour of sumac is a refreshing contrast to the creamy whipped feta


Japanese food weekly vol54

Starbucks Coffee in Hirosaki

Starbucks Coffee opens a store in cultural assets in front of Hirosaki Park.Hirosaki Park is cherry blossom viewing spot.It is in full bloom every year from late April.I watched the cherry tree several years ago. I was moved very much.It is wonderful while drinking Starbucks coffee that a cherry tree can look.

refer to http://iwatejin.blog.so-net.ne.jp/2010-05-05

DOMINIQUE ANSEL BAKERY

DOMINIQUE ANSEL BAKERY open in Tokyo, Omotesanndo.DOMINIQUE ANSEL BAKERY is a shop in New York that originated in Cronut.I like Cronut very much.I want to thoroughly enjoy genuine taste by all means.

refer to http://find-travel.jp/article/9433

Onihei dokoro

You should read this comic if you want to know the history of the Japanese food.It is Onihei Hankacho.The story is politic justice.And the life that is the origin of the Japanese food is pictured.The parking area which can experience a view of the world of Onihei opens.There is in the Tohoku Expressway Hanyu parking area.

refer to Funahashiya


Potato Bread

If you think of bland flavors when you think of potatoes — think again! This recipe produces probably the most flavorful "white" bread we've ever had. Moist and very sliceable, it's wonderful for sandwiches and toast it has that "spongy" texture, perfect for spreading peanut butter or loading on tuna salad without crumbling. An overnight rise in the fridge is the key here. The longer a batch of dough rises, the better its flavor will be and the taste of this bread is superb. Somehow, the combination of potato, butter, and eggs produces an elusive hint of cheese in the final loaf.

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon instant yeast
  • 1/2 cup (99g) sugar
  • 1 1/4 to 1 1/2 cups (283g to 340g) lukewarm water or potato water (water in which potatoes have been boiled)*
  • 12 tablespoons (170g) butter, softened
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons (15g) salt
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 cup (198g) mashed potatoes (from about 1/2 pound potatoes)
  • 6 1/2 cups (780g) King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour

*Use the lesser amount of water in summer, or in humid weather conditions the greater amount in winter, or when it's dry out.

Instructions

Weigh your flour or measure it by gently spooning it into a cup, then sweeping off any excess. Beat together all of the dough ingredients, using the flat beater paddle of your stand mixer, or your bread machine set on the dough cycle. If you're using a stand mixer, beat the mixture for 4 to 5 minutes at medium-high speed, stopping the mixer to scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl twice. The mixture should start to become smooth and a bit shiny.

Switch to the dough hook, and knead the dough at medium speed for 7 minute, stopping to scrape the dough into a ball twice it may or may not start to clear the sides of the bowl on its own. If you're using a bread machine, let it go through its entire kneading cycle, but don't let it rise continue with step 3, below.

Scrape the dough into a ball, and place it in a lightly greased bowl or large (greased) plastic bag. Refrigerate overnight, or for up to 24 hours.

Remove the dough from the refrigerator, divide it in half, and shape it into two 9" logs. Place them each in a lightly greased 9" x 5" loaf pan.

Cover the pans with clear shower caps (first choice) or lightly greased plastic wrap, and allow the dough to rise until it's crowned about 1" over the rim of the pan. Since the dough is cold, this will take anywhere from 2 to 4 hours. Towards the end of the rising time, preheat the oven to 350°F.

Bake the loaves for 25 minutes. Tent with aluminum foil, and bake for an additional 15 to 20 minutes, until the bread is a deep golden brown, and a digital thermometer inserted into the center of one of the loaves registers at least 190°F.

Remove the bread from the oven, and place the pans on a rack. After 5 minutes, gently turn the loaves out onto the rack to cool completely.

Store, tightly wrapped, at room temperature for several days, or up to a week in cool/dry weather for longer storage, wrap well and freeze.

Tips from our Bakers

Want to make this bread with the help of your bread machine? Place the dough ingredients into your machine in the order listed and choose the dough or manual cycle. When the cycle is done, remove the risen dough and shape and bake as directed in the recipe above. Note: Due to the many brands of bread machines on the market and their different features, we can’t guarantee you can bake this bread start to finish in your own machine please use the dough or manual cycle instead.


Watch the video: Lotteria Restaurant 2011 (January 2022).